Is It Bad To Dry Scoop Pre-Workout?

There have been so many trends over the years that have taken TikTok by storm, from entertaining dance challenges to various viral beauty trends, there is always something new happening on this app! 

Is It Bad To Dry Scoop Pre-Workout?

One of these trends that has seen a growth in popularity on TikTok is dry scooping.

But what exactly is dry-scooping? And is it bad to do it before a workout?

In this article, we will tell you everything you need to know about this TikTok trend, and more! So, if this is of interest to you, read on for more! 

What Is Dry Scooping?

Dry scooping is the term used to describe the act of eating supplement powder typically used before a workout, without mixing it with any water.

Many powders that need to be taken before a workout contain ingredients that are performance enhancing, such as beta-alanine, caffeine, creatine, B vitamins, and amino acids.

And, if these ingredients are not taken in the correct way, this can lead to disastrous consequences. Namely, health risks and toxicity. 

Is It Bad To Dry Scoop Pre-Workout?

To answer the question directly. Yes, it is not a good idea to dry scoop before a workout, or any time at all for that matter.

Workout supplements need to be taken correctly to ensure the safety of the individual taking them, it can lead to health risks and toxicity if not done so. 

The negative consequences of this trend have been seen on TikTok.

Sadly, a 20-year-old-woman was admitted to hospital after experiencing chest pain, sweating, and coughing after taking part in this dry-scooping trend.

She was diagnosed with a mild heart attack as a result of the caffeine present in the powder. 

Thankfully, the woman in question recovered fully, but the warnings against dry scooping are vital to pass on to anyone on TikTok thinking of participating in the trend.  

Mild side effects of dry scooping include: 

  • Throat irritation 
  • Vomiting 
  • Choking 

More serious side effects include:

  • Toxicity 
  • Difficulty breathing 
  • Heart problems 

Why Are People Participating In This Dry Scooping Trend?

Dry scooping has become a popular trend due to the belief that it will increase the performance of an individual during a workout, due to the enhancement of the powder’s already-enhancing ingredients.

They also believe that water only works to dilute these ingredients.

None of this information is true. It is dangerous to dry scoop pre-workout powder. It should always be mixed with water. 

What Are The Risks Associated With Pre-Workout Powders? 

Is It Bad To Dry Scoop Pre-Workout?

Even though it is safe to take pre-workout powder after it has been mixed with water, there are still risks associated with it that you need to be aware of.

You should always speak to a medical professional and read the instructions from the manufacturer before taking pre-workout supplements. 

Let’s check out the risks of pre-workout powders in more detail. 

Pre-Workout Powders Are Not Approved By The FDA 

Pre-workout powders are not actually regulated to ensure their safety.

So, this means that they contain ingredients that could potentially cause toxicity – as seen by the consequences of dry scooping.

So, it is vital that you speak to a doctor and do some research into the product to learn as much as you can before you start one. It is better to be safe than sorry! 

Pre-Workout Powders Contain Caffeine 

One other risk associated with pre-workout powder is the amount of caffeine present in one serving.

One serving of pre-workout powder actually contains more caffeine than one cup of coffee. In fact, it contains as much caffeine as three cups of coffee! 

So, if an individual takes too much pre-workout powder or drinks too much too fast, then this can lead to heart problems, a rapid heart rate, dizziness, anxiety, tremors, and chest pain. 

As previously mentioned, this is especially true of dry scooping. 

What Is The Best Thing To Do If Someone Has Tried Dry Scooping?

If you know somebody who has tried the dry scooping TikTok challenge, then the first thing you need to do is keep calm and try not to panic.

You should also try to keep them calm, too, and get them a glass of water to help clear away any pre-workout powder that may be stuck in their throat. 

It is wise to call a poison center for further advice.

However, if the individual starts experiencing sweating, coughing, or chest pain, then you need to call 911 or take them to the emergency room. 

Is It Okay To Dry Scoop Protein Powder? 

No, it is not okay to dry scoop protein powder. This is just as risky and dangerous as dry scooping pre-workout powder.

Just like with the latter, the ingredients in the protein powder need to be mixed with water in order for your system to be able to process the nutrients in the correct way. 

If you take protein powder incorrectly, then this leads to health risks because your organs are not able to process the powder.

And, like with any powder, dry scooping increases the risk of choking. 

Final Thoughts 

Dry scooping is one of the many trends on TikTok that have gone viral over the last few years.

However, unlike the dance challenges and beauty trends, dry scooping is dangerous and can result in serious health risks. 

Dry scooping is the act of taking pre-workout powder (or protein powder) instead of mixing it with water because it enhances the performance-enhancing ingredients and will result in a better workout.

However, this information is false. You will not get a better workout by dry scooping pre-workout powder, and you are putting yourself at risk of anything from choking and throat irritation, to coughing and a mild heart attack. 

So, dry scooping is to always be avoided, and you should always speak to a medical professional before starting new pre-workout supplements even if you intend to use them in the correct way. 

If you know someone who has dry scooped recently, give them some water, call the poison advice line, and if their symptoms worsen, take them to the emergency room or call 911.

Jenna Priestly
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